Wpf floating control

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. The dark mode beta is finally here. Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I've decided to make my own, specialized title bar in my wpf application. So far, everything was going pretty well.

Until I had to make something appear under the title bar at the press of a button for say but OVER the rest of the window content. So the content of the Window will be under my TitleBar. This goes perfectly well. Pretty usual feature there.

The problem is that I want the ValidationPannel to be under the titleBar which it is but over the rest of the content of the window.

As you can see, I tried to use a ZIndex with no success.

wpf floating control

It keep pushing the content under it. Is there a way to make the UserControl float over the content, hidding it until I say it to be invisible again? Not sure I understand what should be over what but if you want to put 2, or more, controls on top of each other then you can use Grid.

Child elements of a Grid are drawn in the order in which they appear in markup or code. As a consequence, layered order also known as z-order can be achieved when elements share the same coordinates. If you set the LastChildFill property to true, which is the default setting, the last child element of a DockPanel always fills the remaining space, regardless of any other dock value that you set on the last child element.

DockPanel will always have this behavior, you should use something else for your content presenter container like Canvas or Grid that doesn't automatically adjust the other controls when something new is added to the layout. Effectively, you need to use a container that supports absolute positioning.Windows Apps need to run in an increasing number of window sizes and resolutions and fortunately the Windows 10 ecosystem helps us with things like the RelativePanel and Visual State Triggers.

But not all positioning issues can or should be solved by responsive layout techniques. As usual, we built a control together with a sample app. This app contains some instances of the so-called FloatingContent that are differently configured:. The control is yet another templated control. That border is wrapped in a zero-height, zero-width Canvas. Top and Canvas.

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Left attached properties. The class is decorated with TemplatePart attributes for the Border and the Overlay, since we use these in the code. In most cases we let a custom control inherit from Control, but this time ContentControl is a better parent:. The FloatingContent control has just one dependency property — Boundary - which is a value from the FloatingBoundary enumeration.

Here are the relevant code snippets:. When the control is loaded, we register an event handler to the SizeChanged of its parent.

A Floating Panel Control for UWP

We have to pick the right parent for this: by crawling up the Visual Tree we look for the closest control with an actual size, since that is the one that will decently respond to SizeChanged :. The most important feature of the FloatingContent control, is following the pointer — finger, pen or mouse pointer, or other. This movement is triggered through the ManipulationDelta event handler. It calculates the theoretical —unbound- position of the control as a rectangle with top, left, width and height.

wpf floating control

The move-the-control code returns a Boolean to let the caller know whether or not the manipulation did actually move the control. He may want to react on this. The commented code in the previous snippet implements some kind of auto-docking feature that stops all movement when a boundary is hit.

As already mentioned, the floating control is moved by updating its Canvas. Left attached properties and is constrained by its Boundary type:. We let the icon appear and disappear by animating this Opacity. The dragging icon appears and disappears smoothly. The other event handlers are similar. The flash effect is the same as the fade-in, but with AutoReverse to True.

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In the right screenshot, Sadness is showing the dragging overlay.Panel elements are components that control the rendering of elements—their size and dimensions, their position, and the arrangement of their child content. Panel Element Common Members. The WPF includes a comprehensive suite of derived panel implementations that enable many complex layouts.

These derived classes expose properties and methods that enable most standard user interface UI scenarios. Developers who are unable to find a child arrangement behavior that meets their needs can create new layouts by overriding the ArrangeOverride and MeasureOverride methods.

For more information on custom layout behaviors, see Custom Panel Elements. For additional information on positioning properties defined by FrameworkElementsee Alignment, Margins, and Padding Overview.

wpf floating control

Panel exposes additional properties that are of critical importance in understanding and using layout. The Background property is used to fill the area between the boundaries of a derived panel element with a Brush.

Children represents the child collection of elements that the Panel is comprised of. InternalChildren represents the content of the Children collection plus those members generated by data binding. Panel also exposes a Panel. ZIndex attached property that can be used to achieve layered order in a derived Panel. Members of a panel's Children collection with a higher Panel.

ZIndex value appear in front of those with a lower Panel. ZIndex value. This is particularly useful for panels such as Canvas and Grid which allow children to share the same coordinate space. Panel also defines the OnRender method, which can be used to override the default presentation behavior of a Panel.

Derived panel elements make extensive use of attached properties. An attached property is a specialized form of dependency property that does not have the conventional common language runtime CLR property "wrapper". Attached properties have a specialized syntax in Extensible Application Markup Language XAMLwhich can be seen in several of the examples that follow. One purpose of an attached property is to allow child elements to store unique values of a property that is actually defined by a parent element.

An application of this functionality is having child elements inform the parent how they wish to be presented in the user interface UIwhich is extremely useful for application layout. For more information, see Attached Properties Overview. Many objects derive from Panelbut not all of them are intended for use as root layout providers.

These panel elements are easy to use, versatile, and extensible enough for most applications. Each derived Panel element treats sizing constraints differently.

Understanding how a Panel handles constraints in either the horizontal or vertical direction can make layout more predictable. The Canvas element enables positioning of content according to absolute x- and y- coordinates. Elements can be drawn in a unique location; or, if elements occupy the same coordinates, the order in which they appear in markup determines the order in which the elements are drawn. Canvas provides the most flexible layout support of any Panel. Height and Width properties are used to define the area of the canvas, and elements inside are assigned absolute coordinates relative to the area of the parent Canvas.

Four attached properties, Canvas. LeftCanvas. TopCanvas. Right and Canvas. Bottomallow fine control of object placement within a Canvasallowing the developer to position and arrange elements precisely on the screen.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I've decided to make my own, specialized title bar in my wpf application.

So far, everything was going pretty well. Until I had to make something appear under the title bar at the press of a button for say but OVER the rest of the window content. So the content of the Window will be under my TitleBar. This goes perfectly well. Pretty usual feature there. The problem is that I want the ValidationPannel to be under the titleBar which it is but over the rest of the content of the window. As you can see, I tried to use a ZIndex with no success. It keep pushing the content under it.

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Is there a way to make the UserControl float over the content, hidding it until I say it to be invisible again? Not sure I understand what should be over what but if you want to put 2, or more, controls on top of each other then you can use Grid. Child elements of a Grid are drawn in the order in which they appear in markup or code. As a consequence, layered order also known as z-order can be achieved when elements share the same coordinates.

If you set the LastChildFill property to true, which is the default setting, the last child element of a DockPanel always fills the remaining space, regardless of any other dock value that you set on the last child element. DockPanel will always have this behavior, you should use something else for your content presenter container like Canvas or Grid that doesn't automatically adjust the other controls when something new is added to the layout.

Effectively, you need to use a container that supports absolute positioning. Something like this should do what you want.

A Floating Popup Control

Note that I haven't included any position logic, this is just the container hierarchy. That way, your validation is always at the top over the contentand the ContentPresenter fills the way it would if it were just the last element in a DockPanel. How are we doing? Please help us improve Stack Overflow. Take our short survey. Learn more. How to make a UserControl float over rest of xaml?

Ask Question. Asked 6 years, 1 month ago.Floating window is one of the state in the DockingManager. Floating window is like a Popup and it has some limitation in resizing. To enable this functionality set its value as Trueby default its value is False. Taskbar displays the icon of running applications for the purpose of switching between applications. To enable or disable the taskbar support for particular window, use the attached property ShowInTaskbar of DockingManager and the default is true.

The CanFloat property helps to enable or disable the floating functionality by setting its value as True or False respectively. By default its value is Trueto disable this functionality turn its value to False.

The float window changes its state to Dock when double click its header by default. To disable this functionality for the specific child, set NoDock property as True. The float window provides Maximization support for better usability and it is only applicable for NativeFloatWindow. To enable the maximizing feature for the Float window, set CanFloatMaximize for the specific child as True. By default, its value is False. The DoubleClickAction property of DockingManager decides whether the NativeFloatWindow can be maximized or moved to dock state while double clicking on header.

Also, if the property DoubleClickAction is MaximizeOrRestorethe NativeFloatWindow will moved to maximized or restored window state while double clicking on header only when its CanFloatMaximize attached property is true. The FloatWindow can be placed at any desired location. Float window can be snapped with the edge of another float window and moving all together in DockingManager.

We can get the snapped windows collection for specific float child using GetSnappedWindows method. Take a look at our next generation Bold Reporting Tools. Learn more. Demo Support Forum Download '. SetShowInTaskbar Toolboxfalse. SetCanFloat Item2false. SetNoDock Content1true. SetCanFloatMaximize Content1true. DockOrFloat. SetAllowSnap Dock4true. GetSnappedWindows Dock1 .By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

The dark mode beta is finally here. Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I'm displaying preview images to users in my UI within a ListBox. When a user hovers over the image, I'd like to expand it so the user can see more detail. I've gotten to the point where I can "pop up" the image, but of course it is still within its normal position in the layout, meaning that rather than the image being displayed on top of the other controls near it, it only appears on top of the controls rendered before it and underneath those rendered after it.

It is also being cropped by the bounds of the ListBox. Is there a simple i. Notice the zoomed image is clipped by the bounds of the ListBox outside of the list box is red.

Also, notice that UI elements rendered after the zoomed image overlay it still--both icons that come later and item names "Item 5" and others seen in the lower left hand corner.

If you are looking for something simple, you could also create a tooltip for the image or ListBoxItem that contains the larger version of the image. It will be displayed just like a normal tooltip when the user hovers over the smaller version of the image. Here is an example:. The effect is similar to what you describe, except the menu item is still there but there is also a larger version of it shown, like this:.

The solution which worked best for me was using the Popup primitive. It doesn't provide much in the way of control when it comes to animation it comes with stock animations but you can animate its contents any which way you like. In this snippet, the popup is not open until IsMouseOver is true for its Image named "icon".

When the mouse enters the image, two things happen. The Popup opens at x and an image is shown 48px by 48px. This image has a scale transform on it. This storyboard uses a double animation, targeted at the popup image's ScaleTransform. This storyboard enlarges the image when the mouse enters and shrinks it when it leaves with a nice easing function. The use case would be: "User is presented a listbox with small images for each item in the list.

When the user hovers over the small image iconit springs forward and enlarges, giving the user a better view of the image.

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When the mouse leaves the image, it shrinks back to its original size. This effect is frequently referred to as Fisheye.The following example shows how to create a Popup control.

Content Model : Popup has one content property: Child.

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A Popup can have a maximum of one child, which can be any UIElement. The following illustration shows a Popup control that has a Button as its parent. For more information, see Popup Placement Behavior. When Popup is displayed on the screen, it does not reposition itself if its parent is repositioned. A Popup displays its content in its own window on the screen.

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A Popup control supports animation when the AllowsTransparency property is set to true and the application is running with full trust. An application that is running with full trust has complete access to system resources and is typically installed on the user's system. For more information, see Security WPF. For bitmap and opacity effects to appear on the content of a Popupyou must set the effects directly on the Popup content.

The content of a Popup does not inherit effects that are set on the Popup control or on any other element that is in the parent window. A Popup is sized to its content by default. When this occurs, applying a RenderTransform or bitmap effects may cause the Popup to be obscured. This occurs because the default size of the content does not provide enough area for the effects to display.

If more space is required, you can define a margin around the Popup content to increase the area that is available to the control. For more information, see ToolTip Overview. Initializes a new instance of the Popup class. Identifies the AllowsTransparency dependency property. Identifies the Child dependency property. Identifies the CustomPopupPlacementCallback dependency property.

Identifies the HasDropShadow dependency property. Identifies the HorizontalOffset dependency property. Identifies the IsOpen dependency property.

Popup Class

Identifies the Placement dependency property. Identifies the PlacementRectangle dependency property. Identifies the PlacementTarget dependency property. Identifies the PopupAnimation dependency property. Identifies the StaysOpen dependency property.

Identifies the VerticalOffset dependency property. Gets or sets a value indicating whether this element can be used as the target of a drag-and-drop operation. This is a dependency property. Gets or sets a value that indicates whether a Popup control can contain transparent content. Gets a value that indicates whether at least one touch is captured to this element or to any child elements in its visual tree.

Gets a value that indicates whether at least one touch is pressed over this element or any child elements in its visual tree.

Floating Panel in wpf.

Gets or sets the BindingGroup that is used for the element. Gets or sets a bitmap effect that applies directly to the rendered content for this element. Gets or sets an input source for the bitmap effect that applies directly to the rendered content for this element.


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